QUANTIFYING MENTAL IDEAS THROUGH SPECIAL RELATIVITY AND BEKENSTEIN-HAWKING FORMULAS

Arturo Tozzi 

Center for Nonlinear Science, University of North Texas

1155 Union Circle, #311427 Denton, TX 76203-5017 USA

tozziarturo@libero.it

 

James F. Peters

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba

75A Chancellor’s Circle Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6 CANADA and

Department of Mathematics, Adıyaman University, 02040 Adıyaman, Turkey

James.Peters3@umanitoba.ca

 

 

 

When perceived by the human mind, an object might encompass a diverse amount of available information, according to different observers. Starting from this simple observation and extending it to the Einstein’s four-dimensional spacetime and to Bekenstein and Hawking equations, we show how, in terms of special relativity, information is not a stationary and fixed quantity as currently believed, but rather depends on the observer’s standpoint. We elucidate how the subjective phenomenon of time (perceived by our mind as static) might give rise to changes in informational entropy between the real and the imagined object. We describe a way to correlate and quantify the information of the sensed object embedded in the environment and of the corresponding internal thought about it (subjective percept). In particular, we show how changes in our mental time windows are able to squeeze the information content of the subjective percepts, compared with their matching environmental, real objects.  Further, we elucidate how this novel framework could be able to confirm or reject a recently raised hypothesis, which suggests that the brain activity takes place in functional dimensions higher than the four-dimensional spacetime environment. 

 

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