AN OPERATIONAL DEFINITION OF LIFE, EVOLUTION AND THEIR PRIMEVAL OCCURRENCE

Arturo Tozzi

Center for Nonlinear Science, University of North Texas

1155 Union Circle, #311427 Denton, TX 76203-5017 USA

Computational Intelligence Laboratory, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada

Winnipeg R3T 5V6 Manitoba

tozziarturo@libero.it,

ArturoTozzi@unt.edu

 

James F. Peters

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba

75A Chancellor’s CircleWinnipeg, MB R3T 5V6 CANADA and

Department of Mathematics, Adıyaman University, 02040 Adıyaman, Turkey

james.peters3@umanitoba.ca

 

 

John S. Torday (Corresponding Author)

Departments of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology

Evolutionary Medicine Program

David Geffen School of Medicine

University of California- Los Angeles

jtorday@ucla.edu

 

 

We will examine one of the traits more frequently suggested in order to define life: living beings are able to produce new individual organisms (offspring), either asexually from a single parent organism, or sexually from two parent organisms.  We will treat life’s occurrence and reproduction in terms of algebraic topology, making clear that two of its more powerful theorems, i.e., the Borsuk-Ulam theorem and the ham sandwich theorem, are able to provide us with a mathematical definition of life, or at least one of its foremost traits.  We discuss the advantages of describing life and evolution in topological terms and conclude with a novel “teleological”, but physically-framed hypothesis concerning the role of the Universe.

 

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