A DIFFERENT ROLE FOR NOISE IN BRAIN OSCILLATORS

A DIFFERENT ROLE FOR NOISE IN BRAIN OSCILLATORS

Arturo Tozzi, MD, PhD, AAP

Center for Nonlinear Science, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203, USA

If we believe that the brain is in phase transition, we may state that spatio-temporal power laws occur, and that they are characterized by scale-free dynamics.  It means that the same functional structure must be displayed at multiple levels of brain activity.  In such a vein, we may hypothesize a system of nested nevels, or “russian dolls”, each one equipped with the same general scheme: from neurons, to cortical layers, to the whole brain.

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P.S.: a very recent paper seens to share and confirm my idea: 

Phase organization of network computations

ARTICLEinCURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY 31C:250-253 · FEBRUARY 2015
Impact Factor: 6.77 · DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.12.011 ·
   
 
 

Abstract

Coupled oscillations are hypothesized to organize the processing of information across distributed brain circuits. This idea is supported by recent evidence, and newly developed techniques promise to put such theoretical framework to mechanistic testing. We review evidence suggesting that individual oscillatory cycles constitute a functional unit that organizes activity in neural networks, and that oscillatory phase (defined as the fraction of the wave cycle that has elapsed relative to the start of the cycle) is a key oscillatory parameter to implement the functions of oscillations in limbic networks. We highlight neural manipulation techniques that currently allow for causal testing of these hypotheses.